Reasons Why Men Should Not Be Ordained For Ministry

10

04-30-2012 Eugene Cho

In light of some recent intense posts – Ultimate Fighting Jesus and Conversation with Rob Bell (re: women in ministry), this list is too funny not to share.
But the brutal fact is that the matter of gender violence isn’t all that funny either. Statistics about gender inequality via UN and UNICEF are even more discouraging.
Regardless where you sit, stand, or wrestle with the issue of women in church leadership, I thought this satirical list was worth sharing for both laughter and even reflection because that’s what good satire forces us to do. And for what it’s worth, I’d encourage you to read some of my thoughts about why I believe women should be included in all levels of church leadership.
Here are…10 reasons Why Men Should Not Be Ordained For Ministry.
I’m personally very convicted about #5 – I am sorry for being such a stumbling block.
How about you?
10. A man’s place is in the army.
9. The pastoral duties of men who have children might distract them from the responsibility of being a parent.
8. The physique of men indicates that they are more suited to such tasks as chopping down trees and wrestling mountain lions. It would be “unnatural” for them to do ministerial tasks.
7. Man was created before woman, obviously as a prototype. Thus, they represent an experiment rather than the crowning achievement of creation.
6. Men are too emotional to be priests or pastors. Their conduct at football and basketball games demonstrates this.
5. Some men are handsome, and this will distract women worshipers.
4. Pastors need to nurture their congregations. But this is not a traditional male role. Throughout history, women have been recognized as not only more skilled than men at nurturing, but also more fervently attracted to it. This makes them the obvious choice for ordination.
3. Men are prone to violence. No really masculine man wants to settle disputes except by fighting about them. Thus they would be poor role models as well as dangerously unstable in positions of leadership.
2. The New Testament tells us that Jesus was betrayed by a man. His lack of faith and ensuing punishment remind us of the subordinated position that all men should take.
1. Men can still be involved in church activities, even without being ordained. They can sweep sidewalks, repair the church roof, and perhaps even lead the song service on Father’s Day. By confining themselves to such traditional male roles, they can still be vitally important in the life of the church.

Updated 5/2: Thanks to our commenters, we’ve tracked down the original source. This list is the work of Dr. David M. Scholer, a former professor at Fuller Theological Seminary.
Eugene Cho, a second-generation Korean-American, is the founder and lead pastor of Quest Church in Seattle and the executive director of Q Cafe, an innovative nonprofit neighborhood café and music venue. You can stalk him at hisblog, Twitter or his Facebook Page. Eugene and his wife are also the founders of a movement of people, stories, and actions to alleviate extreme global poverty. This blog post originally appeared on Eugene Cho’s blog. Watch: 7 Reasons Men Should Not Be Pastors Rea: How to Erase a Person: The Blind Intersection of Race and Gender

See more at: https://sojo.net/articles/10-reasons-why-men-should-not-be-ordained-ministry#sthash.EGvepovT.dpuf

Christianity, Pastors

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Jamaica’s Silent Children

3; 10/15; | Human Rights, Jamaica, Rape, Abuse, Sexual assault

An investigation into the high rate of child sex abuse in Jamaica and the government’s failure to protect its children – Jamaica likes to portray itself as a tropical paradise – its sunshine and laid-back atmosphere attracting millions of tourists every year. But behind this idyllic picture lies a more sinister truth: this is a nation where child sex abuse is endemic.
According to the Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition, 40 percent of Jamaicans say that their first experience of sexual contact was forced and while still under the age of consent. More often than not, the perpetrator was someone close to home: a family member, teacher, community or religious leader.
Earlier this year, the Jamaican government launched “Breaking Silence,” an awareness campaign encouraging victims to come forward. It has been heralded as an important step in combating the cycle of abuse. But, human rights groups say that taboos about reporting incest, rape and the abuse of power by older men are so entrenched that thousands of young Jamaican girls still continue to suffer in silence.
In a society where women are by and large still dependent on men for financial support, poverty and lack of employment opportunities are also driving sexual exploitation of teenage girls; sometimes their parents are even complicit, seeing sex as a legitimate way for a young girl to earn her keep.
Earlier this year, People & Power travelled the country in the company of a survivor, Jamaican writer and advocate Julie Mansfield, as she met with victims, government officials and law enforcement officers in a bid to raise awareness about this issue and achieve greater protections for the island’s children.

Where appropriate, parental consent was obtained for interviews with minors in this programme. For legal and privacy reasons some identities have been obscured.

http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/peopleandpower/2015/09/jamaica-silent-children-150930144953156.htmlSource: Al Jazeera; Impunity cloaks abuse of girls in Jamaica: http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/peopleandpower/2015/09/jamaica-silent-children-150930144953156.html

Jamaica, Child Abuse